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Cat in the sack

Valentino keeping warm under the sheets.

Spain avoids World Cup upset

 

CBS Sports: Spain earned its first win at the 2018 World Cup on Wednesday, narrowly beating Iran 1-0 on a fortunate goal from Diego Costa. Iran played toe-to-toe with Spain and deserved more from the match, but Spain's central defense made some important stops, got the winner in the second half and held on to move into a tie for first place with Portugal in Group B.

Not an impressive result for Spain, who didn't look nearly as sharp in attack as they did in the 3-3 draw against Portugal to open the tournament. They did have 69 percent possession and 17 shots, but only managed three on target. Iran failed to have a shot on target in the game but looked to have scored late; however, video assistant referee confirmed offside.

And this leaves the group really tight for the finish. Spain and Portugal are on four points, while Iran is on three, making the last group stage match between Portugal and Iran a massive one with huge implications. Spain will finish the group stage by facing Morocco. 

Silence of the lambs

On Calle Triunfo.

Man accused of unlawful possession of a firearm

Man with gun face tattoo arrested for unlawful possession of a firearm

The Aural Dissonance of Reza Abdoh

Abdoh and his partner, Brenden Doyle, in Paris, in 1993.
Photograph courtesy Estate of Reza Abdoh

The New Yorker: It is always startling to hear the dead breathe again, speak again. Reza Abdoh, one of the more profound and original theatre artists of the twentieth century, died, of AIDS, in the spring of 1995; he was thirty-two. And yet it’s his voice—political, inconsolable—that we have the privilege of hearing once again in “Reza Abdoh” (at MOMA PS1), the first large-scale retrospective devoted to this Iranian-born spinner of epic, omnivorous tales about queerness, AIDS, American TV and violence, the cult of celebrity, and the gay child’s relationship to the patriarchy. Co-curated by the museum’s director, Klaus Biesenbach, and Negar Azimi, Tiffany Malakooti, and Babak Radboy, of Bidoun, the show is a marvel of archival research and curatorial empathy, paying the kind of attention that Abdoh craved for most of his professional life but had trouble receiving.

In the exhibition’s six rooms, monitors flicker with scenes from the nine productions that Abdoh wrote and directed, including “Peep Show” (1988), which was staged in a derelict motel in Los Angeles and featured sometimes scantily clad performers, full of testiness and threat, acting out scenarios about porn, drugs, and the Contras. Two years later, in New York, Abdoh, with his brilliant company, Dar A Luz, devised “Father Was a Peculiar Man,” an event that took place in the ungentrified meatpacking district, where the air smelled of offal and the cobblestones were slippery with blood. Amid all that, Abdoh’s performers reënacted President Kennedy’s assassination; it was a show that tore apart the idea of heteronormative masculinity as strength, as damage >>>

Enduring heritage

Man watching the World Cup on the big screen in Plaza de Armas.

This didn't end well!

Living on the edge

Valentino on the patio of my friend and neighbor Jeremy.

Let them in

2018 World Soccer Cup, Saint Petersburg, Russia

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